Prof. Dr. Johannes Völz

Prof. Dr. Johannes Völz

Prof. Dr. Johannes Völz

                                                                                               

office: see here

tel: 069/798-32364
e-mail: voelz@em.uni-frankfurt.de

Curriculum Vitae (PDF)



 






The Return of the Aesthetic in American Studies
International Conference
29. November — 1. Dezember 2018

www.returnoftheaesthetic.de

 

   

Johannes Voelz is Heisenberg-Professor of American Studies, Democracy, and Aesthetics, funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). He joined the Institute for English and American Studies in December 2008 as Akademischer Rat auf Zeit and was appointed to full professor in September 2016.

The Heisenberg-Professorship comprises research in three main areas:

 1) Democracy and Aesthetics: Theoretical Perspectives

 2) American Literature and the Transformation of Privacy (additional Research Grant funded by the DFG)

3) The Aesthetics of Market Society

Johannes Voelz is the author of two monographs, The Poetics of Insecurity: American Fiction and the Uses of Threat (Cambridge University Press, 2017) and Transcendental Resistance: The New Americanists and Emerson’s Challenge (University Press of New England, 2010). Moreover he is the editor of a special issue of the journal Telos on Security and Liberalism (published in March 2015) and of a special issue of Amerikastudien/American Studies on Chance, Risk, Security: Approaches to Uncertainty in American Literature (published in October 2016). In addition, he has co-edited several volumes of essays, among them a collection of articles by Winfried Fluck, titled Romance with America? Essays on Culture, Literature, and American Studies (with Laura Bieger; Winter 2009), Civilizing and Decivilizing Processes: Figurational Approaches to American Culture (with Christa Buschendorf and Astrid Franke; Cambridge Scholars, 2011), and The Imaginary and Its Worlds: American Studies after the Transnational Turn (with Laura Bieger and Ramón Saldívar; University Press of New England, 2013).

In October 2019, he joined the Board of Directors at Forschungskolleg Humanwissenschaften Bad Homburg.

https://www.forschungskolleg-humanwissenschaften.de

He is Fulbright-Vertrauensdozent / Liaison Officer of Goethe-Universität Frankfurt.

Please take note of the Fulbright Commission’s funding programs.

https://www.fulbright.de


Education

Habilitation
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, 2015

Dr. phil. 
Freie Universität Berlin, North American Studies, 2008 (summa cum laude)

Magister Artium
Freie Universität Berlin, North American Studies / Philosophy / Political Science, 2003

 


Academic Positions

Heisenberg-Professor für Amerikanistik mit Schwerpunkt “Demokratie und Ästhetik”, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, 2016–

Akademischer Rat a. Z., Institute for English and American Studies, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, 2008–2016

Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter, John F. Kennedy-Institute for North American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin, 2003–2008


International Research and Teaching

Visiting Scholar, Pacific School of Religion, Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, March 1–April 7, 2016

Visiting Scholar, Pacific School of Religion, Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, February 20–March 31, 2015

Visiting Scholar, Stanford University, Comparative Literature, October 2012–September 2014

Visiting Fellow, Harvard University, English Department, September 2006–August 2007

Erasmus Guest Professor, Università di Torino, Dip. di Scienze del Linguaggio e Letterature Moderne e Comparate, March 2006

Exchange Student, University of California, Berkeley, August 1999–June 2000


Fellowships and Grants

Renewal of DFG-Heisenberg-Professorship for American Studies, Democracy, and
Aesthetics, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt (start date: October 2019)

Renewal of DFG research grant (“Sachbehilfe”) “American Literature and the Transformation
of Privacy” (start date: October 2019)

DFG conference grant “The Return of the Aesthetic in American Studies,” Nov. 2018

DGfA/US Embassy conference grant “The Return of the Aesthetic in American Studies,”
Nov. 2018

Vereinigung von Freunden und Förderern der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt (Friends and
Supporters of Goethe-Universität Frankfurt), conference grant “The Return of the
Aesthetic in American Studies,” Nov. 2018

DFG-Heisenberg-Professorship for American Studies, Democracy, and Aesthetics, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt (start date: October 2016)

DFG research grant (“Sachbehilfe”) “American Literature and the Transformation of Privacy” (start date: October 2016)

Vereinigung von Freunden und Förderern der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt (Friends and Supporters of Goethe-Universität Frankfurt), Travel Grant, Berkeley, 2016

Nominee for 2016 Heinz-Maier-Leibnitz-Award, awarded by the DFG

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Faculty of Modern Languages, Postdoc Development Grant (partial teaching buyout), Spring 2015

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt Research Project Development Grant “Nachwuchswissenschaftler/innen im Fokus,” 2014

Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation, Feodor-Lynen Postdoc Fellowship (24 months), Stanford University, 2012–14

DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service), Postdoc Fellowship (24 months), Stanford University, 2012–14 (declined)

Vereinigung von Freunden und Förderern der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt (Friends and Supporters of Goethe-Universität Frankfurt), Travel Grant, 2012

DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service), Travel Grant, 2010

Vereinigung von Freunden und Förderern der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt (Friends and Supporters of Goethe-Universität Frankfurt), Travel Grant, 2010

DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service), Dissertation Research Fellowship (12 months), Harvard University, 2006–07

DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) Fellowship for Study Abroad (10 months), University of California, Berkeley, 1999–2000



       

 

 

Publications

Publications

Monographs

 The Poetics of Insecurity: American Fiction and the Uses of Threat. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2018.
 (reviewed in The Review of English Studies (2018), Novel: A Forum of Fiction (2019), American Literary History (2019), Amerikastudien/American Studies (forthcoming), American Literary Scholarship (forthcoming), European Journal of American Studies (forthcoming))

Transcendental Resistance: The New Americanists and Emerson’s Challenge. Hanover: University Press of New England, 2010.
(reviewed in Studies in Romanticism 51 (2013), European Journal of American Studies (1-2013), Emerson Society Papers (Spring 2012), American Literary Scholarship (2012), Amerikastudien/American Studies 57.3 (2012), American Nineteenth Century History 13.3 (2012), New England Quarterly 84.3 (2011), Choice (August 2011), Church History 80.2 (2011)) 


Edited Books and Special Issues

How to Read the Literary Market. Themed Issue of Zeitschrift für Anglistik und Amerikanistik (ZAA). Ed. Dustin Breitenwischer and Johannes Voelz. Forthcoming 2021.

Kunst als Wertschöpfung. Ed. Heinz Drügh, Vinzenz Hediger, Johannes Voelz. Berlin: August Verlag, 2020, forthcoming.

The Return of the Aesthetic in American Studies. Themed Issue of Yearbook of Research in English and American Literature (REAL) 2019. Ed. Winfried Fluck, Rieke Jordan, Johannes Voelz. Tübingen: Gunter Narr, 2020.

Chance, Risk, Security: Approaches to Uncertainty in American Literature. Special issue of Amerikastudien/American Studies 60.4 (2015), ed. Johannes Voelz.

Security and Liberalism. Special issue of Telos Number 170 (Spring 2015), ed. Johannes Voelz.

The Imaginary and Its Worlds: American Literature after the Transnational Turn. Ed. Laura Bieger, Ramon Saldivar, Johannes Voelz. Hanover: University Press of New England, 2013.
(reviewed in American Literary History 26.3 (2014), Amerikastudien/American Studies 61.2 (2016))

Civilizing and Decivilizing Processes: Figurational Approaches to American Culture. Ed. Christa Buschendorf, Astrid Franke, Johannes Voelz. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011.

Winfried Fluck. Romance with America? Essays on American Culture, Literature, and American Studies. Ed. Laura Bieger and Johannes Voelz. Heidelberg: Winter, 2009.
(reviewed in Amerikastudien/American Studies, European Journal of American Studies)

 
Journal Articles

(with Tom Freischläger). “Toward an Aesthetics of Populism, Part II: The Aesthetics of Polarization.” Yearbook of Research in English and American Literature (REAL) 35 (2019). 261–286.

“Introduction.” Yearbook of Research in English and American Literature (REAL) 35 (2019).
1–10.

“Toward an Aesthetics of Populism, Part I: The Populist Space of Appearance.” Yearbook of Research in English and American Literature (REAL) 34 (2018): 203–228.

translation into German as: “Zu einer Ästhetik des Populismus. Teil I: Der populistische Erscheinungsraum” (Trans. Bernhard Stricker). The Great Disruptor: Über Trump, die Medien und die Politik der Herabsetzung. Ed. Lars Koch, Tobias Nanz, Christina Rogers. Stuttgart: J.B. Metzler, 2020.
Open Access: https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-476-04976-6

“Looking Hip on the Square: Jazz, Cover Art, and the Rise of Creativity.” European Journal of American Studies 12.4 (2017): n.p. (Special Issue: Sound and Vision: Intermediality and American Music, ed. Frank Mehring and Erik Redling). https://journals.openedition.org/ejas/12389

“Transnationalism and Anti-Globalism.” College Literature 44.4 (Fall 2017): 521–526.

“Aestheticizing Insecurity: Response to Security Studies and American Literary History, ed. David Watson” (American Literary History 28.4 [Winter 2016]).” American Literary History 29.3 (Fall 2017): 615–624.

“Wendungen des Neids: Tocqueville und Emerson zum Paradox einer demokratischen Leidenschaft.” WestEnd: Neue Zeitschrift für Sozialforschung 01–2017. 141–154.

“Der Wert des Privaten und die Literatur der ‘Neuen Aufrichtigkeit’.” WestEnd: Neue Zeitschrift für Sozialforschung 01–2016: 145–155.

“In the Future, Toward Death: Finance Capitalism and Security in DeLillo’s Cosmopolis.” Amerikastudien/American Studies 60.4 (2016): 505–526. (special issue: “Chance, Risk, Security: Approaches to Uncertainty in American Literature,” ed. Johannes Voelz).

revised reprint as: “In the Future, Toward Death: Finance Capitalism and Security in DeLillo’s Cosmopolis.” Finance and Society 4.1 (2018): 60–75. (special issue: “Financial Times,” ed. Christian Kloeckner and Stefanie Mueller.)
http://financeandsociety.ed.ac.uk/article/view/2741

Introduction. Amerikastudien/American Studies 60.4 (2016): 385–402. (special issue: “Chance, Risk, Security: Approaches to Uncertainty in American Literature,” ed. Johannes Voelz.)

“The Aspiration for Impossible Security: Revisiting Liberal Political Thought.” Telos 170 (Spring 2015): 23–45. (special issue: “Security and Liberalism,” ed. Johannes Voelz.)

(with Russell Berman) “Introduction.” Telos 170 (Spring 2015): 3–6. (special issue: “Security and Liberalism,” ed. Johannes Voelz.)

“Cold War Liberalism and the Problem of Security.” Post-Exceptionalist American Studies. Ed. Winfried Fluck and Donald Pease. REAL: Yearbook of Research in English and American Literature 30 (2014). 255–281. 

“Emerson’s Dual Economy of Recognition.” Amerikastudien / American Studies 57.4 (2012): 453–480.

“The Future’s Epic Now: The Time of Security and Risk in Don DeLillo’s Cosmopolis.” Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture (special issue: “(In) Securities”) 12.3 (December 2012). http://reconstruction.eserver.org/123/Voelz_Johannes.shtml

“Alienation Revisited.” American Literary History 24.3 (Fall 2012): 618–630.

“A Matter of Style: Charlie Parker and Jack Kerouac between Coolness and Ecstasy.” International Journal of Motorcycle Studies (special issue: “Motorcycle – Beschleunigung und Rebellion?”) 6.1 (Spring 2010).

“Emerson and the Sociality of Inspiration.” Religion & Literature 41.1 (Spring 2009): 83–109.

“Emerson, Representation, and the New Americanists.” Comparative American Studies 6.1 (Spring 2008): 37–54.

“The Index and Its Vicissitudes: Hyperrealism from Richard Estes to Andreas Gursky.” Amerikastudien / American Studies 52.1 (Spring 2007): 81–102.

“Transnationalism and the Realignment of State Power: Two Sides of One Coin.” RIAS: Review of International American Studies 2.3 (September 2007): 21–24.

“Improvisation, Correlation, and Vibration: An Interview with Steve Coleman.” CSI: Critical Studies in Improvisation 2.1 (December 2006).

“Ein Buch ist kein Händedruck: Nachbetrachtungen zu Bill Clintons Mein Leben.” Ästhetik und Kommunikation Issue 127 (Winter 2004): 107–117.

“Meaningful Freedom and the Freedom of Meaning: Free Jazz and the Political.” PhiN: Philologie im Netz Issue 20 (2002): 34–39.


Book Chapters

“Security Theory.” The City in American Literature. Ed. Kevin McNamara. New York: Cambridge UP, 2020, forthcoming.

“Transnational Dimensions of Romanticism.” Handbook of American Romanticism. Ed. Philipp Löffler, Clemens Spahr, Jan Stievermann. Berlin: De Gruyter, forthcoming.

“Notes Toward Thoreau’s Posthuman Democracy.” An Eclectic Bestiary: Encounters in a More-Than-Human World. Ed. Babette Tischleder and Birgit Spengler. Bielefeld: transcript, 2019. 181–194.

“The American Novel and the Transformation of Privacy: Ben Lerner’s 10:04 (2014) and Miranda July’s The First Bad Man (2015).” The American Novel in the 21st Century: Cultural Contexts—Literary Developments—Critical Analyses. Ed Michael Basseler and Ansgar Nünning. Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2019. 323–337.

“Transvaluations of Security.” Projecting American Studies: Essays on Theory, Method, and Practice. Ed. Frank Kelleter and Alexander Starre. Heidelberg: Winter, 2018. 247–257.

“Transnationalism and Nineteenth Century Literature.” The Cambridge Companion to Transnational American Literature. Ed. Yogita Goyal. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2017. 91–106.

“The Uses of Emerson: Transcendentalism, Transnationalism, and the New Americanists.” (revised rpt. of chapter 5 of Transcendental Resistance: The New Americanists and Emerson’s Challenge.) Reading the Canon. Ed. Philipp Löffler. Heidelberg: Winter, 2017. 115–150.

“The New Sincerity as Literary Hospitality.” Security and Hospitality in Literature and Culture: Modern and Contemporary Perspectives. Ed. Jeffrey Clapp and Emily Ridge. New York: Routledge, 2015. 209–226.

 “The Recognition of Emerson’s Impersonal: Reading Alternatives in Sharon Cameron.” American Impersonal: Essays with Sharon Cameron. Ed. Branka Arsić. New York: Bloomsbury, 2014. 73–98.

 (with Laura Bieger and Ramón Saldívar) “The Imaginary and Its Worlds: An Introduction.” The Imaginary and Its Worlds: American Studies After the Transnational Turn. Ed. Laura Bieger, Ramón Saldívar, and Johannes Voelz. Hanover: University Press of New England, 2013. vii–xxviii.

“The Market of Inspiration: Emerson on the Lyceum Stage.” American Economies. Ed. Eva Boesenberg, Reinhard Isensee, Martin Klepper. Heidelberg: Winter, 2012. 327–348.

“Utopias of Transnationalism and the Neoliberal State.” Reframing the Transnational Turn in American Studies. Ed. Winfried Fluck, Donald E. Pease, and John Carlos Rowe. Hanover: University Press of New England, 2011. 356–373.

“Regeneration and Barbarity: Dred and the Violence of the Civilizing Process.” Civilizing and Decivilizing Processes: Figurational Approaches to American Culture. Ed. Christa Buschendorf, Astrid Franke, Johannes Voelz. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011. 123–148.

(with Christa Buschendorf  and Astrid Franke) Introduction. Civilizing and Decivilizing Processes: Figurational Approaches to American Culture. Ed. Christa Buschendorf, Astrid Franke, Johannes Voelz. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011. 1–16.

“‘Blues and the Abstract Truth’ or, Did Romare Bearden Really Paint Jazz?” The Hearing Eye: Jazz and Blues Influences in African-American Visual Art. Ed. Graham Lock and David Murray. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. 194–215.

“‘The Most Indebted Man’: The Reconfiguration of Conformity and Non-Conformity in Emerson’s Representative Men.” Conformism, Non-Conformism and Anti-Conformism in American Culture. Ed. Antonis Balasopoulos, Gesa Mackenthun, Dora Tsimpouki. Heidelberg: Winter, 2008. 101–117.

 

Reviews

Review of Heike Paul et al., eds., The Comeback of Populism: Transatlantic Perspectives (Heidelberg: Winter 2019). Anglia (forthcoming).

Review essay on Sarah Igo, The Known Citizen: A History of Privacy in Modern America (Cambridge: Harvard UP, 2018); David Rosen and Aaron Santesso, The Watchman in Pieces: Surveillance, Literature, and Liberal Personhood (New Haven: Yale UP, 2013); and Karsten Fitz, Bärbel Harju, eds., Cultures of Privacy: Paradigms, Transformations, Contestations (Heidelberg: Winter, 2015). Amerikastudien / American Studies (forthcoming).

Review of Andrew Gross, The Pound Reaction: Liberalism and Lyricism in Midcentury American Literature (Heidelberg: Winter, 2016). Anglia 136.4 (2018): 768–771.

Review of Dieter Schulz, Emerson and Thoreau, or Steps Beyond Ourselves (Heidelberg: Mattes, 2012). Amerikastudien / American Studies 59.4 (2014).

Review of Thoreauvian Modernities: Transatlantic Conversations of an American Icon. Ed. François Specq, Laura Dassow Walls, and Michel Granger (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2013). Amerikastudien / American Studies 59.2 (2014).

Review of Michael Boyden, Predicting the Past: The Paradoxes of American Literary History (Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2009). Comparative American Studies 12.3 (2014): 239–242.

Review of Sarika Chandra, Dislocalism: The Crisis of Globalization and the Remobilizing of Americanism (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2011). Amerikastudien / American Studies 59.1 (2014).

 

Journalism (selection)

 “Kultur der Sicherheit lässt die Sorge sprießen.” Forschung Frankfurt. December 2018: 75–79.
            Reprint in Universitas 1/2019.

“Rausch der Polarisierung,” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Nov. 5, 2018, p. 15.

“Die bedrohliche Welt steckt voller Möglichkeiten: Literatur erklärt Politik: Warum sich die Amerikaner so tiefgreifend um die eigene Sicherheit sorgen.” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 5. April 2016, p.11.

2000–2009: more than 250 articles on music, literature, and film in Der Tagesspiegel (Berlin), Süddeutsche Zeitung online, Münchner Abendzeitung, Jazzthing, Jazz Podium, etc.

 

 

 

Research

Research

I am currently at work on several book projects, each of which takes up a dimension of the interplay of democracy and aesthetics.

 

1) The first monograph project, provisionally titled Postliberal Privacies: Surveillance, Sincerity, and Self-Display in Contemporary American Literature, is emerging from a DFG Research Grant—“American Literature and the Transformation of Privacy”—which also funds the intersecting postdoc project of Dr. des. Stephan Kuhl, who is developing a literary theory of privacy based on a case study of Emily Dickinson. My own subproject examines how contemporary literary writers respond to the changing conceptions of privacy and selfhood in network society. Exploring three scenes of writing—surveillance novels, the “New Sincerity” movement, and literary memoirs—I show how literature contributes to a reformulation of privacy and the private. No longer designating a space secluded from intrusion, the private is increasingly comprehended as an effect and mode of networking. More concretely, I show that the private is becoming tied to the individual’s vulnerability resulting from her embeddedness in network structures. The contemporary recasting of the self’s private dimension thus stresses fleeting, mobile, and even impersonal affects—such as shame—rather than deep interiority. The book consists of three parts. Section 1, “The Quantified Self: Measuring the Private in the Novel of Surveillance,” studies novels by Dave Eggers, Gary Shteyngart, Dana Spiotta, and others. Section 2, “The Embarrassing Self: The Private as Networked Affect in the New Sincerity,” examines works by David Foster Wallace, Ben Lerner, Miranda July, Tao Lin, Karl-Ove Knausgaard, Sheila Heti, Maggie Nelson, and others. Section 3, “The Offended Self: Crafting the Private in Memoirs of Insult and Injury,” probes into works by James McBride, Joan Didion, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Tracy K. Smith, and others.

 

2) The second book project turns to the affective life of democracy and its literary aestheticization in works of American antebellum writers. Provisionally titled Nasty Democracy: Envy, Contempt, and Rage in Antebellum Literature, this book project starts from the premise that democratic life has always been deeply imbricated with the passions. In the decades between 1820 and 1860, US culture underwent an intense process of democratization. This process was marked less by civility and self-constraint (characteristics typically associated with democratic, rational debate) than by the public display of strong—not seldom violent—affects. As portrayed in the literature of the period, democracy as a way of life was frequently “nasty,” but this nastiness did not necessarily signal the demise of democracy into chaos and violence. Putting Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Herman Melville in dialogue with Alexis de Tocqueville, the book explores how the paradoxes of the democratic “equality of conditions” produced states of feeling that shaped the literary imagination of antebellum writers. The writers studied here do not just represent or catalogue democracy’s emotional life, however. They reflect on, and respond to, it by using aesthetic strategies and developing aesthetic forms. As a result, envy, contempt, and rage become multidimensional affective forces that do not simply threaten democracy but, once processed by the literary imagination, become resources for democratic renewal.

 

3) The third book project contributes to the emerging field of “political aesthetics” by developing an aesthetics of U.S. populism of the last forty years. I regard populism as a driving force of the polarization of U.S. society and culture, which has been accelerating since the early 1990s but can be traced back (at least) to the late 1960s. Besides generating academic articles in English, my research project is intended to result in a book-length essay in German, written for a general audience, currently titled Trumpismus: Populismus, Polarisierung und politische Ästhetik. Exploring the populist style and aesthetics of rallies (from George Wallace to Trump), media deployment (Trump’s tweets, etc.), and the reactions to populism by the entertainment culture and the news media, I conceptualize polarization to consist of two intersecting developments: a performative, charismatic type of polarization that depends on the dramatic staging of conflict, which has come to structure the formats of contemporary media culture; and an ideological polarization that has been pushing a wedge into the democratic community beyond the pluralist lines of conflict that have always marked democratic life in the United States. These two lines of polarization come together in the phenomenon of “Trumpism,” a politico-aesthetic constellation that involves much more than the figure of the current president and that will most likely shape US and Western political culture beyond his presidency.

In the News

In the News

Media Appearances




“Verloren! Die Rhetorik von Sieg und Niederlage. Der Amerikanist Johannes Völz im Gespräch.”

Interview on the US Presidential elections 2020. Public radio station Hessischer Rundfunk, hr2, Der Tag. November 6, 2020. [mp3]


Das Zeitalter der Hyperpolitisierung: Die letzten vier Jahre haben gezeigt, dass Politik und Unterhaltung in den USA eine toxische Verbindung eingegangen sind. Die wird nicht mit Donald Trump verschwinden. Ein Essay von Johannes Völz - ZEIT Online, 5. November 2020

https://www.zeit.de/kultur/2020-11/demokratie-usa-donald-trump-stephen-colbert-politisierung-unterhaltung


“Abgestimmt: Die USA nach der Wahl. Der Amerikanist Johannes Völz im Gespräch.”

2-part interview on the day after the presidential elections 2020. Public radio station Hessischer Rundfunk, hr2, Der Tag. November 4, 2020. Part 1: [mp3]; Part 2: [mp3]




“Bleibt er oder kommt einer? Die USA vor der Wahl. Der Amerikanist Johannes Völz im Gespräch.”

2-part Interview on the day of the presidential elections 2020 and on the aesthetics of populism, public radio station Hessischer Rundfunk, hr2, Der Tag. November 3, 2020. Part 1: [mp3]; Part 2: [mp3]




"Gibt es eine 'Ästhetik des Populismus'? Der Amerikanist Johannes Völz im Gespräch." Interview on German national public radio on hyperpoliticization and entertainment politics before the 2020 Presidential elections. Deutschlandfunk, "Kultur Heute," November 1, 2020.  [mp3]




Biden oder Trump? Am 3. November wird in den USA gewählt. Wir haben uns mit dem Amerikanisten Prof. Johannes Völz über die bevorstehende Präsidentschaftswahl in den USA unterhalten.

Dirk Frank: Herr Prof. Völz, am 3. November wird in den USA gewählt. In den Prognosen liegt Joe Biden schon lange deutlich vorne. Könnte das Wahlergebnis dennoch wieder wie vor vier Jahren eine Überraschung sein? Und wann wird das Ergebnis überhaupt vorliegen?

Prof. Völz: Vor vier Jahren haben wir schmerzlich erfahren, dass Wahlprognosen mit Vorsicht zu genießen sind. Insofern wäre es unseriös, Vorhersagen über den Wahlausgang zu machen. Die Situation ist diesmal auch besonders kompliziert. Einerseits gibt es seit Beginn des Jahres eine große Konstanz in den Umfragen und eine sehr kleine Zahl der Unentschiedenen – und dass, obwohl in diesem Jahr so viele Dinge passiert sind, die eigentlich zu Meinungsumschwüngen führen sollten, vom Amtsenthebungsverfahren bis hin zu Trumps Ansteckung mit dem Virus. Das macht deutlich: Diese Präsidentschaftswahl ist in erster Linie ein Referendum über die Person Donald Trump. Und da haben die meisten Menschen eine feste Meinung. Auf der anderen Seite sind diesmal etwa ein Dutzend Staaten umkämpft. Deswegen ist es sowohl möglich, dass Biden ein Erdrutschsieg gelingt, als auch, dass es zu einem völlig unklaren Ergebnis kommt. In drei der umkämpften Battleground States – Pennsylvania, Michigan und Wisconsin – ist nicht damit zu rechnen, dass wir am Wahlabend schon Ergebnisse bekommen. Das liegt daran, dass hier Briefwahlstimmen erst am Tag der Wahl ausgewertet werden dürfen. Mit anderen Worten: ein klares Ergebnis am 3. November bekommen wir nur, wenn Biden so viele Staaten gewinnt, dass es auf diese drei gar nicht mehr ankommt.

(das komplette Interview finden Sie hier)




“40 Tage Kampf - Präsidentschaftswahl in den USA”
Interview on the battle for the Supreme Court, public radio station Hessischer Rundfunk, hr2, Der Tag. September 24, 2020. [mp3]





Schutz gegen Coronavirus-Woher kommt Trumps Masken-Kehrtwende?

Der US-Präsident nennt das Tragen eines Mund-Nasen-Schutzes nun "patriotisch" - zuvor hatte er dies als Schwäche dargestellt. Für die Kehrtwende gibt es verschiedene Gründe.


Prof. Johannes Völz meint hierzu: "Wenn Trump improvisiert, kommt er ins Fabulieren"

Trump nennt das Coronavirus allerdings weiterhin "China-Virus" und spielt damit auf seine alten Vorwürfe an, China habe das Virus in einem Labor gezüchtet. Wissenschaftler gehen dagegen von einem natürlichen Ursprung aus. Sein eigener Geheimdienstkoordinator widersprach Trumps Behauptung, dass es aus einem Labor in Wuhan stamme.

Der Professor für Amerikastudien Johannes Völz von der Uni Frankfurt glaubt indes nicht, dass Trump sein Narrativ mit den Masken durchhält. Bei seinem Pressebriefing hatte sich der US-Präsident weitgehend an sein Skript gehalten - für ihn ungewöhnlich.

"Wenn er beginnt, frei zu improvisieren, kommt er ins Fabulieren und auch in den Duktus des Verschwörungstheoretikers - das bringt ihn fast automatisch auf die Bahn, von den Einschätzungen des medizischen Sachverstandes abzuweichen", urteilt Völz.


Hier der komplette Artikel:

ZDF-heute, 22.07.2020 



Johannes Völz, Amerikanist

Die prominenteste Quelle für sein Studienmaterial befindet sich zurzeit im Weißen Haus in Washington: Wenn Johannes Völz, Professor für Amerikanistik, an seinem Projekt „Ästhetik des Populismus“ arbeitet, kommt er an Donald Trump nicht vorbei: „Trump ist als Reality-TV-Star in den Politikbetrieb gekommen. Schon damals zählten für ihn nur Einschaltquoten, sonst nichts. Dieser Maxime ist er treu geblieben, und so hat er wie kein anderer Kandidat vor ihm Politik zu einer Frage des Entertainments gemacht“, erläutert Völz. „Trumps Selbstinszenierung ist für das Präsidentenamt absolut unangemessen, und zwar nicht nur stilistisch. Die Covid-19-Krise zeigt, dass diese Inszenierung zu einer dysfunktionalen Politik führt. Das Zusammengehen von Politik und Ästhetik in dieser Form ist ein Problem für die Demokratie.“ Schon an dieser Stelle wird deutlich, dass Völz mit Ästhetik nicht nur das meint, was Johann Wolfgang von Goethe als das „Wahre, Gute, Schöne“ bezeichnet hat. Wenn Völz seiner DFG-geförderten Heisenberg-Professur die Denomination „Demokratie und Ästhetik“ gibt, versteht er darunter die ursprüngliche Bedeutung des altgriechischen Wortes „Aisthesis“: sinnliche Wahrnehmung und Empfindung. „Es geht mir dabei um die Erwartungen an die Lebensform Demokratie“, stellt Völz klar. Aus ihnen resultiere nämlich ein bestimmter Anspruch an Freiheit und Gleichheit; die Menschen seien nur dann der Meinung, dass sie tatsächlich in einer Demokratie lebten, wenn ihnen das, was sie Tag für Tag erlebten, auch das Gefühl vermittele, sie seien Freie und Gleiche. Völz: „Ob diese Ansprüche erfüllt werden, beurteilen die Menschen primär auf der Ebene der Sinne und Empfindungen, also ästhetisch.“

Politisierung der Pandemie

In der US-amerikanischen Gesellschaft habe in den späten 1960er Jahren als Reaktion auf die Bürgerrechtsbewegung ein Prozess der politischen Polarisierung eingesetzt, erläutert Völz; diese Polarisierung werde jetzt durch den Populisten Trump auf die Spitze getrieben. „Wie zu jedem Menschen gehören natürlich auch zu jedem US-Amerikaner verschiedene Facetten der Persönlichkeit, und die politische Haltung ist nur ein kleiner Teil davon“, sagt Völz. „Aber mittlerweile müssen sich dieser Haltung alle anderen Identitätsaspekte unterordnen: ‚Welches Auto fahre ich?‘ ‚Wo kaufe ich ein?‘ ‚Welche Sportart betreibe ich?‘ ... all das wird von der Frage mitbestimmt, zu welchem politischen Lager ich gehöre.“ Besonders deutlich werde das in den USA derzeit in der „Corona-Debatte“: Die Politisierung der Pandemie führe den demokratischen Diskurs ad absurdum. Zwar sei es durchaus im Sinne der Demokratie, wenn Menschen die Krise unterschiedlich bewerten. Doch Amerikaner könnten sich noch nicht einmal darüber verständigen, ob es überhaupt eine Pandemie gebe. Solch eindimensionales Lagerdenken muss die Missbilligung eines Amerikanisten hervorrufen, widerspricht es doch direkt dem interdisziplinären Ansatz des Fachs Amerikanistik, zumal in seiner Frankfurter Ausprägung – dessen Horizont am Institut für England und Amerikastudien der Goethe-Universität reicht von (US-)amerikanischer Literatur bis hin zu Film, Geschichte, Kunst, Philosophie und Soziologie. Diesen breit gefächerten Ansatz verteidigt Völz leidenschaftlich gegenüber allzu enger Spezialisierung. Er selbst hat neben Amerikanistik auch Philosophie und Politikwissenschaft studiert. Und auch wenn er sich heute in erster Linie als Literaturwissenschaftler versteht, gesteht er: „Beim Blick auf die Bücher auf meinem Schreibtisch komme ich manchmal ins Grübeln, ob ich nicht eigentlich Philosoph oder Politikwissenschaftler sein will.“ Interdisziplinarität ist auch der Leitgedanke seines institutionellen Wirkens. Seit Oktober 2019 prägt er als Mitglied des wissenschaftlichen Direktoriums das Programm des Forschungskollegs Humanwissenschaften (Bad Homburg) wesentlich mit und etabliert die transatlantischen Beziehungen als Schwerpunkt an der Goethe- Universität. Außerdem schlägt sich sein Profil zwischen Literaturwissenschaft, Politikwissenschaft und Philosophie in den Forschungsverbünden nieder, die er momentan mit Frankfurter Kolleg*innen entwickelt. Dazu zählen ein Graduiertenkolleg zu Demokratie und Ästhetik und die Exzellenzcluster-Initiative „ConTrust: Vertrauen im Konflikt. Politisches Zusammenleben unter Bedingungen radikaler Ungewissheit“, an der er als leitender Wissenschaftler mitwirkt.

Highschool in Colorado

Er selbst wurde entscheidend geprägt durch das Jahr, das er in seiner Jugend an einer Highschool im Norden des US-Bundesstaats Colorado verbracht hat: „Schon vorher habe ich mich für amerikanische Literatur und Jazzmusik begeistert, aber als ich aus Colorado zurückkam, stand für mich fest: Ich studiere Amerikanistik und setze mich mit amerikanischer Kultur auseinander“, erinnert sich Völz. Ganz besonders fasziniert habe ihn, wie die aufgeschlossene und zugängliche Art der Amerikaner ihn dazu gebracht habe, unbekannte Seiten an sich zu entdecken und Dinge zu tun, die er sich „als etwas steifer Deutscher“ nicht ohne Weiteres zugetraut hätte. Die US-amerikanische Kultur hat er inzwischen als zutiefst rassistisch, als vielfach sexistisch, als Ansammlung ökonomischer Katastrophen erlebt, in der die herrschende Ungleichheit gewaltige soziale Sprengkraft besitzt. „Und trotzdem ist – erstaunlicherweise – diese Kultur geprägt von den normativen Ansprüchen von Freiheit und Gleichheit, mit anderen Worten: geprägt von den normativen Ansprüchen der Demokratie“, stellt Völz fest. „Diesen augenscheinlichen Widerspruch finde ich absolut faszinierend.“ Stefanie Hense


Bericht she. hier:

UniReport 3/20 (S.12)




"Trump und die ideologische Polarisierung: Der Amerikanist Johannes Völz über die Midterm-Wahlen", Web-Magazin Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, 9.11.2018
https://aktuelles.uni-frankfurt.de/gesellschaft/trump-und-die-ideologische-polarisierung-der-amerikanist-johannes-voelz-ueber-die-midterm-wahlen/

Johannes Voelz, "Rausch der Polarisierung", Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Nov. 5, 2018, p. 15.

Die Früchte des Zorns - Gewalt in der amerikanischen Politik.
Interview on rallies of President Donald Trump, public radio station Hessischer Rundfunk, hr2, Der Tag. October 30, 2018. [mp3]

Newspaper coverage of book presentation of The Poetics of Insecurity at Forschungskolleg
Humanwissenschaften, Bad Homburg, June 26, 2018: Brigitte Gaiser, “Die
Demokratie und die Angst: Wissenschaftler diskutieren über amerikanische Literatur,”
Taunus Zeitung, July 4, 2018.
http://www.taunus-zeitung.de/lokales/hochtaunus/vordertaunus/Wissenschaftler-diskutieren-ueber-amerikanische-Literatur;art48711,3036734

"The Poetics of Insecurity" by Johannes Voelz – An International Roundtable Across the Disciplines, May 4th, 2018.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iyjQeSmAFmQ

Bannon überschätzte sich.” Interview, Frankfurter Neue Presse, Jan. 11, 2018, p. 3.
http://www.fnp.de/nachrichten/politik/So-schaetzt-Frankfurter-Amerikanistik-Professor-den-Rechtspopulismus-in-den-USA-ein;art673,2875811

Cited in Dieter Hintermeier, “’Einmaliger Irrtum der Geschichte’: Hessische Einschätzungen zu einem Jahr Donald Trump.Frankfurter Neue Presse, Nov. 8, 2017, p. 3.
http://www.fnp.de/nachrichten/politik/Einmaliger-Irrtum-der-Geschichte;art673,2818965

Report on the workshop „Was war demokratische Kultur?“ July 7, 2017, co-hosted by Till van Rahden and Johannes Völz at Forschungskolleg Humanwissenschaften Bad Homburg.
https://aktuelles.uni-frankfurt.de/gesellschaft/nachbericht-zum-workshop-was-war-demokratische-kultur/
(Quelle: Webmagazin Uni Frankfurt)

“Friede, Freude, LSD? Der Mythos vom Summer of Love.”
Interview on the Beat Generation, public radio station Hessischer Rundfunk, hr2, Der Tag. July 14, 2017.
[mp3]

“Zeitzeichen: Ralph Waldo Emerson.” Interview on the anniversary of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s death, national public radio feature WDR 5, WDR 3, NDR Info, SR, April 27, 2017.
[mp3]

“Jedem Abschied wohnt ein Zauber inne – Obama in Deutschland.” Interview on Obama and American literature, public radio station Hessischer Rundfunk, hr2, Der Tag, Nov. 16, 2016.

“Johannes Völz zu Donald Trump: Ob Horror oder Begeisterung – die Wahl Donald Trumps gilt als politisches Erdbeben. Warum ist diese Wahl tatsächlich epochal? Fragen an den Amerikanisten Johannes Völz.” Interview national public television, 3sat Kulturzeit. Nov. 10, 2016.
[mp4]

“Er gibt der Wut ein Ventil: USA-Experte Johannes Völz spricht über Trumps überraschenden Erfolg.”
Interview, Frankfurter Neue Presse, Nov. 10, 2016, p. 3.
http://www.fnp.de/lokales/frankfurt/Trump-hat-den-Menschen-ein-Ventil-fuer-ihre-Wut-gegeben;art675,2312120

“Aufstieg und Krise einer Weltmacht. Amerika erzählt.” Interview on American literature, public radio station Hessischer Rundfunk, hr2, Der Tag. Nov 8, 2016.
[mp3]
Copyright by hr2 kultur
http://www.hr-online.de/website/radio/hr2/index.jsp?rubrik=22844

“Demokratische Kultur am Ende – USA noch zu retten?” Interview on public radio station Hessischer Rundfunk, Hr-Info, Das Thema. Nov 8, 2016.
[mp3]
Copyright by hr-iNFO
http://www.hr-online.de/website/radio/hr-info/

Cited in Sascha Zoske, „Groteske Figuren und lädierte Charaktere: Forscher schauen auf den Präsidentenwahlkampf und den Populismus“. Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Oct. 25, 2016. p. 32.