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MolBI

Welcome to Molecular Bioinformatics

Our group was established in March 2010 and works in the field of Bioinformatics & Computational Systems Biology. We are interested in algorithm and method development and applications to answer questions in molecular biology. In this context, we are focusing on modeling and analysis of biochemical systems and computational protein structure analysis.

We are using various methods, such as graph-theory, general network analysis techniques, Boolean networks, Petri net formalism and others, to explore biochemical systems at different levels of abstraction. These systems cover metabolic networks, signal transduction networks, and gene-regulatory networks. Because of the size and complexity of biochemical networks, models of them have to be investigated for their correctness and completeness. Thus, we are interested in network validation techniques and network reduction approaches.

Moreover, we are interested in structural questions of proteins and their topology applying graph-theoretic methods.

GCB 2020

Single Cell Workshop 2020

Single Cell Workshop 2020

CCB2020


4th CHALLENGES IN COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY MEETING:
SINGLE CELL DATA ANALYSIS
18 September 2020

[Link]

GBM Information

GBM Info

GBM - Gesellschaft für Biochemie und Molekularbiologie e.V. stellt sich vor

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jGBM - die juniorGBM stellt sich vor

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Interacting Spider Webs

Interacting Spider Webs

Protein-protein interactions patterns after bacterial infection

Molecular Bioinformatics group: Jens Rieser, Daniel Bruneß, Ina Koch


Pathogenic bacteria influence regulatory processes and cell functions of the host organism. The representation of all proteins and their interaction can serve as fingerprint of a bacterial infection. Here, you see such a fingerprint of a HeLa cell after Salmonella infection. The picture shows more than 1,000 proteins and about 6,000 interactions. The understanding how bacteria perturb regulatory processes of a cell has implications for the development of new drugs.